Life the Univers and Environment
Robin Williams tribute

Robin Williams, a man who brought me more laughter and happiness in my childhood than I can ever repay. He kept entertaining me and making me smile into my adult life. From Mork and Mindy and Toys to Mrs Doubtfire and Fluber he is one of my all time favorite actors.He was an amazing stand-up comedian and an outstanding individual for his contribution to the film world. There will most definitely not be another like him. 

rhamphotheca:

Green Forest Lizard (Calotes calotes), male, Kirinda, Sri Lanka
(via: Camp Téru Yala)

rhamphotheca:

Green Forest Lizard (Calotes calotes), male, Kirinda, Sri Lanka

(via: Camp Téru Yala)

rhamphotheca:

BABY KITTEN REPORT!!!

Palawan Bengal Cats Are First of Berlin Zoo’s Breeding Program

Meet Ilian and Taytay, two Palawan Bengal Cats recently born at Berlin Zoo in Germany! These two kittens, a male and a female, are the first offspring of Berlin Zoo’s breeding program for this Vulnerable subspecies, which is only found on the Philippine island of Palawan…

Learn more: ZooBorns

rhamphotheca:

What it Means to be a Threatened Species
by International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN)
Most people know what it means to be a threatened species—it’s something that’s rare and may become extinct. What isn’t often explained is how we know something is threatened and who decides whether a species is threatened or not.
Read almost any article about species in peril and there will be some reference to the level of threat faced by that species. Words like Vulnerable, Endangered, and Critically Endangered are usually mentioned without any real explanation of where these categories come from or how they are determined.
Part of the reason for this is that it’s just easier to take the author’s word for it and move on. However, in science, the author’s word is not good enough—statements must be supported by data and methods and these must be presented for open (and often scathing) review by other scientists. This process of peer-review is the foundation of all credible scientific work and species science is no exception…
(read more: National Geo)
Photograph by IUCN Photo Library/Steve Winter

rhamphotheca:

What it Means to be a Threatened Species

by International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN)

Most people know what it means to be a threatened species—it’s something that’s rare and may become extinct. What isn’t often explained is how we know something is threatened and who decides whether a species is threatened or not.

Read almost any article about species in peril and there will be some reference to the level of threat faced by that species. Words like Vulnerable, Endangered, and Critically Endangered are usually mentioned without any real explanation of where these categories come from or how they are determined.

Part of the reason for this is that it’s just easier to take the author’s word for it and move on. However, in science, the author’s word is not good enough—statements must be supported by data and methods and these must be presented for open (and often scathing) review by other scientists. This process of peer-review is the foundation of all credible scientific work and species science is no exception…

(read more: National Geo)

Photograph by IUCN Photo Library/Steve Winter

scienceyoucanlove:

The hammerhead worm is a master of regeneration. Cut one into eight pieces, and you’ll get seven new hammerhead worms. Twice a month they’ll reproduce by deliberately sticking their tails to the ground, pulling them off, and that tail will become a new hammerhead worm.Read more about this bizarre creature at Bec Crew’s latest blog for Australian Geographic:http://ow.ly/wFrHL
source 

scienceyoucanlove:

The hammerhead worm is a master of regeneration. Cut one into eight pieces, and you’ll get seven new hammerhead worms. Twice a month they’ll reproduce by deliberately sticking their tails to the ground, pulling them off, and that tail will become a new hammerhead worm.

Read more about this bizarre creature at Bec Crew’s latest blog for Australian Geographic:http://ow.ly/wFrHL

source 

woodendreams:

(by Carlos Rojas)
earthlynation:

(via 500px / Leopard Yawn by Hendri Venter)

scientificvisuals:

The feeding frenzy scene from Planet Earth: Ocean Deep (S1, EP11). A dead fish, probably a tuna, is completely devoured by deep-sea scavengers, including spider crabs, deep-sea eels, and giant isopods. The crabs are supposed to be a meter across while the isopods are about 1/3 meter (~1.09 feet) long. There’s not much left of the fish after the scavengers are done.

This time-lapsed footage was taken 2,000 meters (~6562 feet) underwater in the Gulf of Mexico, over a span of three hours. The BBC Natural History Unit worked with the “Scientific and Environmental ROV Partnership Using Existing Industrial Technology” (SERPENT) project to connect with industries that could help position their camera rig — painstakingly designed to withstand the deep-sea pressure — on the ocean floor for several days.

woodendreams:

( by allan oman)

realmonstrosities:

Hopkin’s Rose is a beautifully tentacular nudibranch from the coasts of California and Oregon.

They steal their lovely pink colour from the rosy bryozoan they feed on.

It’s named after Timothy Hopkins, a guy who inherited a load of money from his adopted parents, used a whole lot of it to support the local university, and probably had amazing taste in roses.

Images: Ken-ichi Ueda/Jerry Kirkhart

distant-traveller:


Inside the Flame nebula







Stars are often born in clusters, in giant clouds of gas and dust. Astronomers have studied two star clusters using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and infrared telescopes and the results show that the simplest ideas for the birth of these clusters cannot work, as described in our latest press release.
This composite image shows one of the clusters, NGC 2024, which is found in the center of the so-called Flame Nebula about 1,400 light years from Earth. In this image, X-rays from Chandra are seen as purple, while infrared data from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope are colored red, green, and blue.
A study of NGC 2024 and the Orion Nebula Cluster, another region where many stars are forming, suggest that the stars on the outskirts of these clusters are older than those in the central regions. This is different from what the simplest idea of star formation predicts, where stars are born first in the center of a collapsing cloud of gas and dust when the density is large enough.

Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/PSU/K.Getman, E.Feigelson, M.Kuhn & the MYStIX team; Infrared:NASA/JPL-Caltech

distant-traveller:

Inside the Flame nebula

Stars are often born in clusters, in giant clouds of gas and dust. Astronomers have studied two star clusters using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and infrared telescopes and the results show that the simplest ideas for the birth of these clusters cannot work, as described in our latest press release.

This composite image shows one of the clusters, NGC 2024, which is found in the center of the so-called Flame Nebula about 1,400 light years from Earth. In this image, X-rays from Chandra are seen as purple, while infrared data from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope are colored red, green, and blue.

A study of NGC 2024 and the Orion Nebula Cluster, another region where many stars are forming, suggest that the stars on the outskirts of these clusters are older than those in the central regions. This is different from what the simplest idea of star formation predicts, where stars are born first in the center of a collapsing cloud of gas and dust when the density is large enough.

Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/PSU/K.Getman, E.Feigelson, M.Kuhn & the MYStIX team; Infrared:NASA/JPL-Caltech

bullshit-bullsharks:

biomorphosis:

Tarsier is one of the smallest primate in the world. It thrives mostly in secondary dense forests with a diet of insects. This nocturnal creature has the unique ability of being able to turn its head 180 degrees as well as to jump backward with precision. It is endangered and have a tendency to commit suicide during captivity due to trauma from touching and loud noise.


If you ever go to their native habitat or a facility that has these animals, make sure to visit one that does NOT allow handling! More often than not, tarsiers in those situations die from stress. I saw these in an area set aside for their conservation, and there was minimal talking allowed, along with no flash photography and absolutely NO touching the animals. It’s better for their well being, because stress kills them very quickly. Be smart and selfless with your ecotourism. :)

bullshit-bullsharks:

biomorphosis:

Tarsier is one of the smallest primate in the world. It thrives mostly in secondary dense forests with a diet of insects. This nocturnal creature has the unique ability of being able to turn its head 180 degrees as well as to jump backward with precision. It is endangered and have a tendency to commit suicide during captivity due to trauma from touching and loud noise.

If you ever go to their native habitat or a facility that has these animals, make sure to visit one that does NOT allow handling! More often than not, tarsiers in those situations die from stress. I saw these in an area set aside for their conservation, and there was minimal talking allowed, along with no flash photography and absolutely NO touching the animals. It’s better for their well being, because stress kills them very quickly. Be smart and selfless with your ecotourism. :)

libutron:

Pinguicula esseriana | ©Carlos Tatsuta
These beautiful rosettes belong to the species Pinguicula esseriana (Lamiales - Lentibulariaceae), a butterwort endemic to San Luis Potosí state in Mexico.
It is a carnivorous plants that use sticky, glandular leaves to lure, trap, and digest insects.

libutron:

Pinguicula esseriana | ©Carlos Tatsuta

These beautiful rosettes belong to the species Pinguicula esseriana (Lamiales - Lentibulariaceae), a butterwort endemic to San Luis Potosí state in Mexico.

It is a carnivorous plants that use sticky, glandular leaves to lure, trap, and digest insects.

mothernaturenetwork:

15 of the hardest-working moms in the animal kingdomThe animal kingdom can be ruthless to young animals — and sometimes, dad’s not around to help. These meticulous mothers go to extremes to ensure the survival of their offspring, and they deserve some credit for their efforts.

mothernaturenetwork:

15 of the hardest-working moms in the animal kingdom
The animal kingdom can be ruthless to young animals — and sometimes, dad’s not around to help. These meticulous mothers go to extremes to ensure the survival of their offspring, and they deserve some credit for their efforts.

fuckyeahcarnivorousplants:

Clayton’s Red Sunset Venus Flytrap

fuckyeahcarnivorousplants:

Clayton’s Red Sunset Venus Flytrap